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Historic Homes are in Several Fort Worth Neighborhoods.

tudor house in Fort WorthFort Worth was established in 1848 on a bluff overlooking the Trinity River as a U.S. Army outpost. After the Army abandoned the Fort in 1853 citizens moved in and repurposed the military buildings as hotels, saloons and stores. Residential development spread around the edges of the Fort into the area that is now downtown Fort Worth, and then into neighborhoods that reflected the social status of the residents who settled there. When the railroad arrived on July 18, 1876 the area between today’s Lancaster Avenue and the original settlement near today’s County Courthouse flourished with hotels, saloons and other businesses. At that time nearly everyone lived within today’s central business district.

As the affluent citizens moved out in the early 1900s into the neighborhoods of Berkeley, Fairmount, Ryan Place, Quality Hill and Samuels Avenue, the center city gave way to working class neighborhoods which have now mostly disappeared. Ethnic minorities lived on the edges of downtown on the near east side and near south side which were in close proximity to hotels, factories and other businesses that set up along the train’s route through town. Few of those early homes still remain however the near south side is in the midst of a rapiclassic house with flower gardend gentrification with the development of multifamily and single family homes as well as condos in a “live-work” environment with shops, factories and restaurants as their neighbors.

Magnolia Avenue is Fairmount’s “Main Street” and homes in the Fairmount National Historic District are within walking distance of a great selection of restaurants, nightclubs and entertainment venues.

In the 1920’s and 1930’s Fort Worth’s movers and shakers who made their fortunes in cattle and oil moved into other areas further away from downtown including Arlington Heights, Rivercrest (Crestline), Fort Worth HomesMonticello, Park Hill, Berkeley, Mistletoe Heights, North and South Himount, Crestwood and Oakhurst. Today these neighborhoods continue to be popular with affluent citizens of Fort Worth. In the 1950’s and 1960’s further residential expansion took place with the building of new neighborhoods featuring larger lots and ranch-style floor plans. These homes are found today in the neighborhoods of Westover Hills, Ridglea, Ridglea Hills, Morningside and South Hills. The area’s homes most often built in the mid century modern style are in Westover Hills, Ridglea Hills and several East Fort Worth neighborhoods.

Many of Fort Worth’s historic homes and neighborhoods have been brought into the current era through restoration and revitalization of the city’s special legacy neighborhoods.

Fort Worth homes in the Mid Century architectural style are in high demand.

mid century homes in Fort WorthMid century homes can be found in east Fort Worth around Morningside Drive, as well as the neighborhoods of Westcliff and Ridglea Hills to the west. The area’s luxury Mid-Century homes are concentrated mostly in the Westover Hills area but there are pockets of them throughout the city. Check out some mid century modern homes here.

Tudor style homes are popular in Fort Worth.

In the 1920’s and 1930’s the west Texas oil boom and money from cattle and agriculture fueled the economy and many of Fort Worth’s most coveted historic neighborhoods were built during this time. Homes of brick construction with curved rooflines, open porches, porte cocheres and glazed masonry ornamentation were built in several areas of Fort Worth including Arlington Heights, TCU and Oakhurst . Many newer homes in desirable neighborhoods have brought the style back into popularity. See some tudor style homes here.